News

Love waves from the ocean floor

Supercomputer simulations of planetary-scale interactions show how ocean storms and the structure of Earth’s upper layers together generate much of the world’s seismic waves. Decoding the faint but ubiquitous vibrations known as Love waves could yield insights about Earth’s storm history, changing climate and interior. Title: Love waves from the ocean floorSourced From: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201113103730.htmPublished Date:

Ice sheets on the move: How north and south poles connect

Over the past 40,000 years, ice sheets thousands of kilometers apart have influenced one another through sea level changes, according to new research. New modelling of ice sheet changes during the most recent glacial cycle demonstrates, for the first time, that during this period, changes in the Antarctic ice sheet were driven by the melting

Offshore submarine freshwater discovery raises hopes for islands worldwide

Twice as much freshwater is stored offshore of Hawai’i Island than previously thought, revealed a new study with important implications for volcanic islands around the world. An extensive reservoir of freshwater within the submarine southern flank of the Hualalai aquifer was mapped by researchers with Hawai’i EPSCoR ‘Ike Wai project, showing a way in which

True origin of oldest evidence of animals

Scientists have resolved a longstanding controversy surrounding the origins of complex life on Earth. The studies found molecular fossils extracted from 635-million-year-old rocks aren’t the earliest evidence of animals, but instead common algae. Title: True origin of oldest evidence of animalsSourced From: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201123112510.htmPublished Date: Mon, 23 Nov 2020 11:25:10 EST Your browser does not support

The connectivity of multicomponent fluids in subduction zones

A team of researchers has discovered more about the grain-scale fluid connectivity beneath the earth’s surface, shedding new light on fluid circulation and seismic velocity anomalies in subduction zones. Title: The connectivity of multicomponent fluids in subduction zonesSourced From: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201112100855.htmPublished Date: Thu, 12 Nov 2020 10:08:55 EST <a href="https://www.musiclessons.com/youtube/watch?v=JhtyTTsnHaA">https://www.musiclessons.com/youtube/watch?v=JhtyTTsnHaA</a><br /> <!– start sw-rss-feed code –>

Tree rings may hold clues to impacts of distant supernovas on Earth

Massive explosions of energy happening thousands of light-years from Earth may have left traces in our planet’s biology and geology, according to new research. Title: Tree rings may hold clues to impacts of distant supernovas on EarthSourced From: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201111144400.htmPublished Date: Wed, 11 Nov 2020 14:44:00 EST <a href="https://www.ultratop.be/showyoutube.asp?id=JhtyTTsnHaA">https://www.ultratop.be/showyoutube.asp?id=JhtyTTsnHaA</a><br /> <!– start sw-rss-feed code –> <script

A jigsaw puzzle made of ancient dust

During the last Ice Age about 20,000 years ago, iron-containing dust acted as a fertilizer for marine phytoplankton in the South Pacific, promoting carbon dioxide sequestration and thus the glacial cooling of the Earth. But where did the dust come from? Title: A jigsaw puzzle made of ancient dustSourced From: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201109110223.htmPublished Date: Mon, 09 Nov

Mystery of glacial lake floods solved

A long-standing mystery in the study of glaciers was recently and serendipitously solved. A trigger was identified for some of the largest floods on Earth — those emerging suddenly and unpredictably from beneath glaciers or ice caps. Title: Mystery of glacial lake floods solvedSourced From: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201107133920.htmPublished Date: Sat, 07 Nov 2020 13:39:20 EST <a href="https://krivoruky.ru/tv.php?c=JhtyTTsnHaA">https://krivoruky.ru/tv.php?c=JhtyTTsnHaA</a><br

Polar climate affects trade wind strength in tropics

The impact of sea surface temperature variations in the tropical Pacific on global climate has long been recognized. For instance, the episodic warming of the tropical Pacific during El NiƱo events causes melt of sea ice in far-reaching parts of the Southern Ocean via its effect on the global atmospheric circulation. A new study demonstrates